Saturday, 21 November 2015

IMAGINARY FRIENDS, IMAGINARY ENEMIES: THE FAR RIGHT THAT NEVER WAS



You cannot put the genie back in the bottle. They are the people, not you. They will turn the tide, madam president, and turn it must.

Geert Wilders, speech to the Dutch lower parliament

 

The easiest way to elect a new people is to import them.

Mark Steyn, After America

 

 

Now that the Parisian gunfire has died away, at least for the time being, the inevitable post mortem takes place. Sadly, the various key players in Europe’s future will not have as their priority castigating themselves for their inevitable intelligence shortcomings, or actually increasing the safety and security of ordinary, blameless people who have been unfortunate enough to wonder into someone else’s civil war. They have a more pressing issue. It is not ISIS – or whatever the brand name for Islam is this week – from which they must protect their people and democracies; the enemy is within.

Instead of addressing what the American security services call the ‘clear and present danger’ resulting from importing Islam, the tone across Europe and its agenda-driven leaders seems to be; stop the far Right. The importation of a psychotic death cult seems not to worry them too much, except to ensure that the rate of migration is increased; dissent does. The Guardian wasted no time in voicing its shrill and gormless fears about the Parisian attacks ‘fuelling the far Right’. Be in no doubt as to who is being portrayed as the enemy within here. A big clue, to adapt the hook-line of the threnodic song being sung by the unelected gauleiters of the declining West, is that they’ll have nothing to do with Islam.

The first real show of force from the cabal running the EU was the Parisian ‘march of unity’ after the bloodbath at Charlie Hebdo, the attack for which John Kerry claimed that he could see a ‘rationale’. It was a march of unity, but not unity against Islamic terrorism. Instead, the extended photo-op – which Obama did not attend, sending James Taylor instead – was a combined gauleiter-Juncker class action suit against any real people tempted to march against their de facto programme of imported Islamisation.

We have since seen how the Germans have responded to PEGIDA. Merkel called them ‘Nazis in suits’, and sent her police forces to protect migrant centres rather than the hospitals and tower blocks where immigrants have, by several accounts, been conducting their mini-insurgencies. These are people, these ordinary Germans concerned about the cataclysm they see unfolding in front of them, who must be stopped by any means necessary. Across Europe, increasingly as one looks east, dissent is both growing and subject to EU crackdowns. Our own de facto political prisoner has been doing some travelling too. Tommy Robinson was in Prague two weeks ago to address the Czech offshoot of PEGIDA, and had been appearing wherever these pockets of dissent spring up. Expect to see him harassed, imprisoned and put in harm’s way once again before very long.

In Robinson’s country, the governmental cry goes up once again for more surveillance powers, despite demonstrable evidence that surveillance in no way prevented the 13/11 attacks in Paris. But the surveillance is not intended to stop terrorist attacks; the surveillance is intended to put an end to dissent. Those people who dare to question the wisdom of bringing into Europe tens of thousands of unassimilable Mohammedans are the real targets of the ever-expanding governmental remit to snoop and spy and suspect.

And for Orwell’s Pansy Left, of course, the attacks have been another opportunity for moral signalling and preening. Various Leftist sock-puppets and taqiyya artists have been popping up on the BBC to warn against Islamophobia – a word invented by the Muslim Brotherhood to help quell dissent – and shriek about the demons and kobolds of the European ‘far Right’, the bogeymen fascists of their fevered imagination, such as it can be said to be.

Orwell it was, of course, who astutely demonstrated that the use of the word ‘fascist’ and its cognates was not nominal but emotive. ‘The word Fascism,’ writes Orwell, ‘now has no meaning except in so far as it signifies something not desirable.’ It has been ‘degraded to the level of a swearword.’ This precisely defines the usage by the modern Progressive Left, a Left that has become increasingly and systematically silent concerning Orwell, who should be their talisman but is too astute and tied to reality for the quasi-psychotics of the post-modern Left.

The Left despise ‘fascists’. I’ve been called one many times. It’s not too onerous; the Nazis had fantastic dress sense. But the Left define themselves dialectically; we are not those bad people over there. They must be fascists. It’s the same ontological exercise Freud describes in the infant with relation to his excrement. It is not me. It is bad. It is death while I am life.

There is no far Right, unless you are talking about the football thugs who will increasingly be involved in the coming troubles. There is, however, a demonstrable far Left. They run the governments of the West; they dominate the media, government’s provisional wing; they have seized the schools, curricula and syllabus; they instantiate the public sector (someone with known Right-wing sympathies would simply not be employed in the public sector if those affiliations were known); they have neutered the armed forces and turned the police into paramilitary social workers. They will never stop, even as the world collapses around them. They are creating a world in which their children must live; their children will not thank them for it.

But then their children will have been taught, with all the rigour of Socialist indoctrination, that it was not the Left that was to blame, but the far Right.

So, then; believe. If you are of the opinion that a political ideology masquerading as a religion is not the current danger facing the West, that instead it is the massed hordes of the ‘far Right’, good luck, and may your god go with you.

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